Bananas in the Twin Cities

joshuaploeg:

A few weeks ago I got to enjoy the Twin Cities again, which I love doing a couple of times a year.
The week-long visit was bookended by Dinner and Bikes in St. Paul, which was lovely and sold out.
Hosted at Bang Brewery, which had some very interesting organic beers with some cryptic names…
Nice,…

Cacao!

joshuaploeg:

Got a new book all about chocolate! Vegan dietician Matt Ruscigno breaks down the history, nutrition info, and deliciousness of cacao/chocolate while I back him up with 75 mostly savory recipes and some witty banter. A must have!

image

Get it here…

johndarnielle:

emotionallychargedtowel:

johndarnielle:

microcosmpub:

In the vein of the classic Soy Not Oi cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears compiles three issues of the previously self-published vegan cook zine with a range of tasty and simple animal-free dishes. The collection finally makes available these long-obscure fanzines originally published in the mid 1990s. Here you’ll find incredible recipes for stews, soups, sauces, noodle & bean dishes, baked entrees, deserts and more! There is also a fair smattering of new material bringing this to a whopping 160 pages of deliciousness! These recipes are written to be simple, straightforward, and perfect for the newest convert to the vegan revolution! But far from bring just a vegan cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears reads as a look into vegan lifestyle and underground culture. The book is thoroughly illustrated with eye-catching drawings and clearly laid-out graphics. In addition, the book also includes assorted rantings about music and the politics of leading a vegan lifestyle. Together the book provides easy-to-make and delectable recipes while reflecting the DIY punk rock sensibility of zine culture. 

also on the high recommendations list is this cookbook. I knew it in its original zine format; someone (@rambleready?) gave me a copy when I’d only been veg for a year or three. I used it so often that it got dog-eared and water-damaged and chewed up by mice, but I bet it’s still tucked between books somewhere in my cookbook shelf. Please Don’t Feed the Bears is veg cooking minus the “oh no, what if I can’t find a kaffir lime” factor that can be frustrating when you’re first saying to yourself: “wow, if I ate at home I could feed three of my friends for what I’ll spend on myself at a restaurant.” not that restaurants aren’t also fun when you have the scratch to spare! but for me, learning to cook and bake — for myself, for my family, for my friends — has been one of the most joyous journeys of my adult life, and Please Don’t Feed the Bears has been a companion along the path for many years. 
tl;dr get this cookbook! it’s full of anybody-can-do-this recipes that won’t break the bank and it’s a lot of fun besides!

I would love to own this cookbook, but I won’t buy it as long as it is put out by Microcosm Publishing. As a survivor of domestic violence, I can’t support a business run by a partner abuser who has consistently run a supposedly “radical” business like an oligarchy. Boycott Microcosm Publishing, now & forever. If you want to know more about why, a quick google search will yield a multitude of reasons. 
edited to add: I also strongly recommend reading Brainscan #21 if you really want to know what underlies the whole Microcosm boycott thing. There are other factors but this one is central. 

I did this quick Google search as soon as I saw this note on my post; had no idea. I think everybody knows where I stand on questions of abuse and accountability, i.e., with all victims, forever. 

Thanks John for plugging this. It’s very saddening to see this post turn into something negative and one-sided. These public accusations about a relationship that ended eleven years ago have been the single most focused upon issue here, ever. We’ve done everything that was asked of us and yet there is not a way for the community to heal:
Here’s a statement that we posted originally in 2011 outlining how Joe and Microcosm have responded to requests and how the community has responded:http://microcosmpublishing.com/blogifesto/2013/01/a-statement-from-the-microcosm-collective


And here’s one our then-owner did in 2012:
http://punkjoanofarc.tumblr.com/post/31947231290/jessies-response-to-my-open-letter-and-follow-up


Here’s a more recent summary by Joe:
http://microcosmpublishing.com/blogifesto/2014/05/reddit-ama-w-joe-biel
and that’s most of what happened in the last eight years or so.


And an interview from a few years before that:
http://wemakezines.ning.com/profiles/blogs/riding-against-the-wind-talking-with-joe-biel


And here’s where Joe’s current partner of the last six years explains that she sees nothing like this in his life:
http://wemakezines.ning.com/forum/topics/microcosm-issues?commentId=2288844%3AComment%3A119033

What is it that people want from us? There simply isn’t a path to resolution here and it’s just causing more hurt for everyone in proximity. 

johndarnielle:

emotionallychargedtowel:

johndarnielle:

microcosmpub:

In the vein of the classic Soy Not Oi cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears compiles three issues of the previously self-published vegan cook zine with a range of tasty and simple animal-free dishes. The collection finally makes available these long-obscure fanzines originally published in the mid 1990s. Here you’ll find incredible recipes for stews, soups, sauces, noodle & bean dishes, baked entrees, deserts and more! There is also a fair smattering of new material bringing this to a whopping 160 pages of deliciousness! These recipes are written to be simple, straightforward, and perfect for the newest convert to the vegan revolution! But far from bring just a vegan cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears reads as a look into vegan lifestyle and underground culture. The book is thoroughly illustrated with eye-catching drawings and clearly laid-out graphics. In addition, the book also includes assorted rantings about music and the politics of leading a vegan lifestyle. Together the book provides easy-to-make and delectable recipes while reflecting the DIY punk rock sensibility of zine culture. 

also on the high recommendations list is this cookbook. I knew it in its original zine format; someone (@rambleready?) gave me a copy when I’d only been veg for a year or three. I used it so often that it got dog-eared and water-damaged and chewed up by mice, but I bet it’s still tucked between books somewhere in my cookbook shelf. Please Don’t Feed the Bears is veg cooking minus the “oh no, what if I can’t find a kaffir lime” factor that can be frustrating when you’re first saying to yourself: “wow, if I ate at home I could feed three of my friends for what I’ll spend on myself at a restaurant.” not that restaurants aren’t also fun when you have the scratch to spare! but for me, learning to cook and bake — for myself, for my family, for my friends — has been one of the most joyous journeys of my adult life, and Please Don’t Feed the Bears has been a companion along the path for many years. 

tl;dr get this cookbook! it’s full of anybody-can-do-this recipes that won’t break the bank and it’s a lot of fun besides!

I would love to own this cookbook, but I won’t buy it as long as it is put out by Microcosm Publishing. As a survivor of domestic violence, I can’t support a business run by a partner abuser who has consistently run a supposedly “radical” business like an oligarchy. Boycott Microcosm Publishing, now & forever. If you want to know more about why, a quick google search will yield a multitude of reasons. 

edited to add: I also strongly recommend reading Brainscan #21 if you really want to know what underlies the whole Microcosm boycott thing. There are other factors but this one is central. 

I did this quick Google search as soon as I saw this note on my post; had no idea. I think everybody knows where I stand on questions of abuse and accountability, i.e., with all victims, forever. 

Thanks John for plugging this. It’s very saddening to see this post turn into something negative and one-sided. These public accusations about a relationship that ended eleven years ago have been the single most focused upon issue here, ever. We’ve done everything that was asked of us and yet there is not a way for the community to heal:

Here’s a statement that we posted originally in 2011 outlining how Joe and Microcosm have responded to requests and how the community has responded:
http://microcosmpublishing.com/blogifesto/2013/01/a-statement-from-the-microcosm-collective
Here’s a more recent summary by Joe:
and that’s most of what happened in the last eight years or so.
And here’s where Joe’s current partner of the last six years explains that she sees nothing like this in his life:
What is it that people want from us? There simply isn’t a path to resolution here and it’s just causing more hurt for everyone in proximity. 
In the vein of the classic Soy Not Oi cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears compiles three issues of the previously self-published vegan cook zine with a range of tasty and simple animal-free dishes. The collection finally makes available these long-obscure fanzines originally published in the mid 1990s. Here you’ll find incredible recipes for stews, soups, sauces, noodle & bean dishes, baked entrees, deserts and more! There is also a fair smattering of new material bringing this to a whopping 160 pages of deliciousness! These recipes are written to be simple, straightforward, and perfect for the newest convert to the vegan revolution! But far from bring just a vegan cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears reads as a look into vegan lifestyle and underground culture. The book is thoroughly illustrated with eye-catching drawings and clearly laid-out graphics. In addition, the book also includes assorted rantings about music and the politics of leading a vegan lifestyle. Together the book provides easy-to-make and delectable recipes while reflecting the DIY punk rock sensibility of zine culture. 

In the vein of the classic Soy Not Oi cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears compiles three issues of the previously self-published vegan cook zine with a range of tasty and simple animal-free dishes. The collection finally makes available these long-obscure fanzines originally published in the mid 1990s. Here you’ll find incredible recipes for stews, soups, sauces, noodle & bean dishes, baked entrees, deserts and more! There is also a fair smattering of new material bringing this to a whopping 160 pages of deliciousness! These recipes are written to be simple, straightforward, and perfect for the newest convert to the vegan revolution! But far from bring just a vegan cookbook, Please Don’t Feed The Bears reads as a look into vegan lifestyle and underground culture. The book is thoroughly illustrated with eye-catching drawings and clearly laid-out graphics. In addition, the book also includes assorted rantings about music and the politics of leading a vegan lifestyle. Together the book provides easy-to-make and delectable recipes while reflecting the DIY punk rock sensibility of zine culture. 

almostnormalcomics:

Xerography Debt #35 is a 68-page, digest size, B&W review zine edited by Davida Gypsy Breier and published by Leeking Inc.
In this issue’s introduction to Xerography Debt Davida channels the curiosity of Tom Waits and Paul Gauguin as she explores the state of publishing and questions where we’re going and “What’s He (Amazon) Building In There?”  Davida provides an insider as well as a zinester view of the publishing industry and the impact Amazon has had on it.  In her essay she examines the motivation of Amazon, their relationship with authors, and the bleak future we appear to  be headed toward.
In addition to Davida’s introduction there are also a handful of columns included in this issue.  They are: Joe Biel’s The Best of Intentions, The Weirdest of Methods; Gianni Simone’s Gloomy Sundays, The Mail Art Interview project; Jeff Somers’ It Means It’s Wank, That Giant Sucking Sound; Josh Medsker’s Twenty-Four Hours; Kari Tervo’s Zinethropology; Ken Bausert’s Pete’s Mini Zine Fest; and Kris Mininger’s It Comes In The Mail: An Interview with Ned Brooks.  Lots of enlightening and enjoyable stuff to appreciate!
As much as I dig reading Davida’s intros and the other guest columns, the real meat of Xerography Debt for me are the reviews!  And the neat thing about Xerography Debt is that the reviewers only review publications they like, and they are free to write their reviews in a format of their choosing.  The result is page after page of enthusiastic and informative descriptions of zines and comics from some really talented DIY’ers. In all there are around 50 pages of reviews in this issue written by: Andria Alefhi; Anne Thalheimer; D. Blake Werts; Davida Gypsy Breier; Eric Lyden; Frederick Moe; Fred Argoff; Gavin Grant; Joe Biel; Josh Medsker; Ken Bausert; Kris Mininger; Liz Mason; Maynard Welstead; and Stuart Stratu.  Hope I didn’t miss anybody!
Xerography Debt is a great resource for learning about issues affecting the zine scene and for discovering what’s out there worth reading!
Get your copy, and learn how to submit your zine or comic for review, at Leeking Inc.

almostnormalcomics:

Xerography Debt #35 is a 68-page, digest size, B&W review zine edited by Davida Gypsy Breier and published by Leeking Inc.

In this issue’s introduction to Xerography Debt Davida channels the curiosity of Tom Waits and Paul Gauguin as she explores the state of publishing and questions where we’re going and “What’s He (Amazon) Building In There?”  Davida provides an insider as well as a zinester view of the publishing industry and the impact Amazon has had on it.  In her essay she examines the motivation of Amazon, their relationship with authors, and the bleak future we appear to  be headed toward.

In addition to Davida’s introduction there are also a handful of columns included in this issue.  They are: Joe Biel’s The Best of Intentions, The Weirdest of Methods; Gianni Simone’s Gloomy Sundays, The Mail Art Interview project; Jeff Somers’ It Means It’s Wank, That Giant Sucking Sound; Josh Medsker’s Twenty-Four Hours; Kari Tervo’s Zinethropology; Ken Bausert’s Pete’s Mini Zine Fest; and Kris Mininger’s It Comes In The Mail: An Interview with Ned Brooks.  Lots of enlightening and enjoyable stuff to appreciate!

As much as I dig reading Davida’s intros and the other guest columns, the real meat of Xerography Debt for me are the reviews!  And the neat thing about Xerography Debt is that the reviewers only review publications they like, and they are free to write their reviews in a format of their choosing.  The result is page after page of enthusiastic and informative descriptions of zines and comics from some really talented DIY’ers. In all there are around 50 pages of reviews in this issue written by: Andria Alefhi; Anne Thalheimer; D. Blake Werts; Davida Gypsy Breier; Eric Lyden; Frederick Moe; Fred Argoff; Gavin Grant; Joe Biel; Josh Medsker; Ken Bausert; Kris Mininger; Liz Mason; Maynard Welstead; and Stuart Stratu.  Hope I didn’t miss anybody!

Xerography Debt is a great resource for learning about issues affecting the zine scene and for discovering what’s out there worth reading!

Get your copy, and learn how to submit your zine or comic for review, at Leeking Inc.

readbymoonlight:

Title: On The Books
Author: Greg Farrell
Publisher: Microcosm Publishing 
Full Disclosure: Bought
Book Description: On the Books is the firsthand comic strip account of the labor struggle at New York City’s legendary Strand bookstore in the summer of 2012. Told by Greg Farrell—an employee of the store who interviewed numerous other staff members—the book examines the motives and actions of those involved, including the management, the staff, the union local, and the people of New York City. Through interstitial comic portraits, Farrell gives voice to his comrades, who often share a nuance of the story that would have otherwise gone overlooked, and provide a depth of opinion and fairness to accompany Farrell’s often very personal interpretation of events. The book explores at once the inner workings of our national retail environment, the struggles as a young working person, and the current state of the book trade.
My Review: For those of you who know/known me in real life and on tumblr… This is a completely important, brilliant and informative non-fiction work. Greg is indeed a coworker of mine and I am one of the Tier Two employees here. This may sound dumb, but our struggle is real. I often joke openly to my fellow coworkers and managers that being at Strand is like being at School again. Between the level of drama and being scheduled lunch, daily tasks etc… is like being treated as a child again. 
I admit writing this isn’t easy, because embarrassingly I am afraid of the potential consequences that it could stir up where I work. However, time to be brave and supportive. Greg nailed it. He’s a primary source to what happened in the last contract negotiations, he did extensive research from primary and secondary sources for other events in the Strand’s and the Union’s history and at no point, did I feel like his criticism was unfair. I think if you love the Strand and it’s employees you need to read this. I think if you’re a New Yorker you need to read this. I think if you are human you need to read this. You can pick up copies of his book from him at Strand and Forbidden Planet also sells copies.
Overall Rating: 7/7

readbymoonlight:

Title: On The Books

Author: Greg Farrell

Publisher: Microcosm Publishing 

Full Disclosure: Bought

Book Description: On the Books is the firsthand comic strip account of the labor struggle at New York City’s legendary Strand bookstore in the summer of 2012. Told by Greg Farrell—an employee of the store who interviewed numerous other staff members—the book examines the motives and actions of those involved, including the management, the staff, the union local, and the people of New York City. Through interstitial comic portraits, Farrell gives voice to his comrades, who often share a nuance of the story that would have otherwise gone overlooked, and provide a depth of opinion and fairness to accompany Farrell’s often very personal interpretation of events. The book explores at once the inner workings of our national retail environment, the struggles as a young working person, and the current state of the book trade.

My Review: For those of you who know/known me in real life and on tumblr… This is a completely important, brilliant and informative non-fiction work. Greg is indeed a coworker of mine and I am one of the Tier Two employees here. This may sound dumb, but our struggle is real. I often joke openly to my fellow coworkers and managers that being at Strand is like being at School again. Between the level of drama and being scheduled lunch, daily tasks etc… is like being treated as a child again. 

I admit writing this isn’t easy, because embarrassingly I am afraid of the potential consequences that it could stir up where I work. However, time to be brave and supportive. Greg nailed it. He’s a primary source to what happened in the last contract negotiations, he did extensive research from primary and secondary sources for other events in the Strand’s and the Union’s history and at no point, did I feel like his criticism was unfair. I think if you love the Strand and it’s employees you need to read this. I think if you’re a New Yorker you need to read this. I think if you are human you need to read this. You can pick up copies of his book from him at Strand and Forbidden Planet also sells copies.

Overall Rating: 7/7

DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info
DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.
Zoom Info

DINNER + BIKES, PART EIGHT: THE ADVENTURE! Over 8,000 miles we replaced only three hoses and a fuel filter on the van. Aaron lost a sweatshirt just like last year and Joe lost his third leatherman on the third year in a row and swears he had another “special” pen stolen. Only one trip to the Emergency Room and everyone is still friends.